Arabic Music in Jewish Culture Expository Speech #1, July 3, 2014

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Comment by Samuel Reisman on January 13, 2015 at 9:19pm

I love your point about how religious and emotional feeling were incorporated from Arabic culture into these songs. I guess being a people scattered in many lands enriches you because you are exposed to foreign nuance that becomes an integral part of your religiosity!

Very thought provoking!

Comment by Tzvi on January 7, 2015 at 3:49pm

A truly fascinating part of Jewish cultural history.... In the past, R. Yisroel Najara, author of the popular Ya Ribbon Alom sung on the Sabbath, was persecuted by leading rabbis for adopting Arabic tunes for his poetry. We have lightened up over the centuries and now appreciate the good parts of Arab culture.

Comment by Dan Marciano on December 14, 2014 at 8:35pm

What an excellent speech! Coming from a Arab Country, I really know about all these instruments. 

Comment by Samuel Reisman on November 11, 2014 at 7:36pm

It is especially moving to hear a heartfelt speech about topics that one may be unaware of, but really ripples beneath the current of so much that one holds dear (similar to Rabbi Berel Wein point about the forest and the treas...). Thank you for opening my eyes! The complex synthesis of cultural identity that the Jewish people have accumulated as they passed through so many parts of the world is truly fascinating. I have always enjoyed Sephardi music that is saturated with ancient and modern Arabic influences, and my enjoyment will surely be enhanced by your presentation.

Comment by kizelnk on November 9, 2014 at 7:02pm

This speech was informative and a real eye opener for the avid music listener. Since my childhood years, I always enjoyed listening to middle eastern music. The presentation explains the origin of middle eastern music and the instruments these melodies are played with.  The speaker intertwines history, culture and religion in a seamless manner that's easy to follow and comprehend.

Comment by Richard Green on July 8, 2014 at 7:22pm

"The Maghreb Orchestra is a unique project, bringing together prominent Israeli musicians, whose teacher, spiritual father and artistic director is Nino Bitton, the oud virtuoso from Jerusalem and one of the indisputable authorities in the field of Judeo-Arabic music. Every Friday, during their afternoon concerts, an Israeli audience tightly fills the cult Jerusalem bar, Avram. Also on Friday, but this time in the Tempel Synagogue in Krakow, The Maghreb Orchestra will take you on a journey to a world of the music of the enthralling ecstatic rhythms and delightfully beautiful traditional melodies of the Maghreb and Andalusia. Their music will entrance and move you with its deep truth and sincerity." http://www.jewishfestival.pl/-the-maghreb-orchestra,139,ar,en.html

Comment by Richard Green on July 8, 2014 at 7:19pm